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An Open Letter to HEMAA 2018 Election Candidates

Reposted without alteration and with permission from the original post by Jake Priddy here. 

First of all, I want to acknowledge everyone’s willingness to step forward and run for a largely thankless, “behind the scenes” position of volunteer work in hopes of benefitting the HEMA community. Thank you for that.

As a lifetime member of HEMAA and the owner of an affiliate club, I beg your indulgence for a few minutes to please read this thoroughly, because it comes from a place of love for the organization and the community, and I’m quite sure I’m not alone in what I’m going to express.

This campaign season is going to be as it ever was, I’m sure, full of “Star Wars Empire” memes, despot jokes, and basically thumbing noses at the entire election process because, after all, you guys are volunteers right? Hey, you’re willing to do it and no one else is, or they’d have stepped up, right?
Wrong.

Make no mistake, the HEMAA is an organization comprised of people who have a real stake in the decision to be members. Running a HEMA club even more so, for affiliate club membership has some very real consequences for those who choose it. So what I ask is this: within the joke posters, memes and campaign popularity contest tomfoolery, I would appreciate it if you considered your position on some very real issues and have something to say on them. It isn’t enough to be the only one willing anymore, because the choice is not “made for us” to be a HEMA affiliate. We can choose to simply not be a part of it at all.

Yes, I’m being the “Debbie Downer” here, because there are some things that need to be addressed. In the past year, the HEMAA has changed. It has spent time, effort and money on creating a new logo, yet spent its yearly budget for event support in the first quarter of its fiscal term. It has collected yearly insurance monies, and then revised how insurance would work after those premiums were collected. It has revised and expanded its safety requirements, over and above those required by the insurer. It has changed how affiliates are to handle membership – again, over and above the insurer’s requirements – mostly what seems to me to be for the sake of promoting a sponsored website (TidyClub) and as a means of forcing individual membership to be handled by the HEMAA rather than its affiliate clubs. Now, it has changed how the nomination process of determining candidates works so that candidates must self-nominate.

That’s quite a bit of “revision” in an organization that can be called to task on several supposed “benefits of membership” that have been less than consistent. These are issues. They should be addressed. Whether they are looked at in the light of improvements, reflective of the direction the HEMAA wants to go or mistakes that need mending is a position that should be thought about and addressed to the voters. I encourage you all to please, take some time, delve into what has been going on, and please make some part of your campaign a real position on a real reason to vote for you specifically, and what you intend to try and accomplish more than “whatever needs done.”

Do you know what “vote for Tyranny!” and “I’ll do whatever needs done!” tells us?
It tells us you haven’t got a clue of what needs done, and volunteerism does not equal qualified.

Richard Marsden EARNED the “Tyrant” meme by actually accomplishing things and being an organizer and leader, and HEMAA was better for his tenure.

Be like Marsden. Earn your meme, campaign on your reality.
Thanks for listening!
Jake Priddy
Fenris Kunst des Fechtens
Martinsburg WV

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Letters to the Community: James Clark

The HEMA community has exploded in the last four years, especially after the widely-publicized and well-received coverage of Longpoint by The New York Times. Since then, the number of HEMA students and clubs has exploded. This has come with its good and bad parts–the fruition of a dream that many people worked tirelessly for for years. However, it’s also led to a breakdown of communication between the community at large and the people who built it.

This article series is a chance for members within the community to hear from some of the people who built it–where HEMA comes from, what it’s intended for, and why some things are done the way they are, as well as ideas for tackling problems our community currently faces.

This is the first of those letters, from an instructor in the northeastern U.S. named James Clark. James has been studying HEMA for 16 years, and is currently affiliated with Capital KdF and MEMAG Luray. His current focus is montante.

 

Letter to the community, from James Clark: 

Throughout my competitive HEMA career, I have received many, many, injuries. I’ve had my ankle broken by being intentionally crushed by a friend at one event, each of my wrists has been broken twice (two triple-fractures on one, and one double and one triple on the other), my left shoulder’s been dislocated in ringen at another, three fingers broken (my left thumb twice), five concussions, and too many bruises and face-waffles to count. I know that I have also myself dealt out at least two concussions to others I care about.

One thing I’ve learned through this, is that face-to-face voicing of force concerns is something that’s always lacked in HEMA. When it does happen face to face, it’s enough of a shock that feels personal. A friend from Maryland bringing mine up to me face to face one Longpoint followed by a thinly-veiled passive aggressive post after [Longpoint South], is what caused me to take a serious, then more serious, look at my buffalo-ish fencing, as while I was fast, I didn’t think I was hitting terribly strong (I was wrong).

It also got me started paying attention to others complaining about similar things at my home club and other events. Complaints are very rarely directed at the offender, always complaining behind the back after the fact to others, or scowling off on the sideline or to another spar. This was when we in HEMA were still in the knowing-everyone category.

Cultures of excessive force, irreverence, and harm-to-win, form in the school when people choose to save face with someone by not complaining. The harmer learns either that their excess let them win, that taking a hit to give a hit is a good idea, or that someone beating them should be punished. Then that goes into an event, where these new competitive souls can turn off their “this is my school” inhibition button and “let loose” even more for the sake of competition. Someone who has not learned the boundaries of harm is not going to be able to feel when they cross it, and pose a danger to others.

Nowadays in HEMA, this same withdrawn attitude has gone online, with more people who have never met each other and have even less of a reason to care about each other than in years past. On top of that, the faces of HEMA as well as most event organizers and school leaders have a laissez faire attitude of “ignore it and it’ll take care of itself” or “well, others will take care of it, we don’t need to punish anything ourselves” when they see or hear about it in other schools or events.

The internet community of practitioners meanwhile does what it does best, which is get threateningly angry for a week or two, then completely forget about the problem and move on. Rather than the approach of willful, hopeful, ignorance or that of petulant anger, we need to learn to enforce ourselves against both willful and neglectful harm. We need to remove intentional irreverent harm as a possible, redeemable, action for winning a bout or tournament, which unfortunately does mean unintentional breaks of discipline need to be handled similarly to intentional violations.

At events, individuals that who perform actions intentionally harmful, or seemingly intentionally harmful, need punishment at that point of infraction. This operant conditioning is intended to give a visceral response to someone pumping with adrenaline, who can now no longer use it. People remember they didn’t get their reward, people remember when they did something bad in front of their peers. Whether that punishment is a penalty, or forfeiture from the tournament, or expulsion from the event would depend on the infraction.

People with empathy will strive for more discipline after receiving an eye-opener. Someone without empathy will continuously be kicked out, and schools will learn to teach which behaviors are unacceptable, or stop bringing undisciplined people for competition before they’re ready. Groups have very small attention spans, an individual person learns and remembers. When a person is punished, they will take that to their group, and that group will learn and remember from that person more easily. This allows the groups to more easily, readily, and quickly change their internal cultures to self-select people who are too forceful or spiteful and train that out of them.

People will speak out, people will pay more attention to themselves, and the culture of “harm-to-win” will diminish in that club. Without both event culture and school cultures cracking down together, this will probably just steadily worsen.


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Running Successful Small & Medium Sized Events

by Meg Floyd

 lprap5

 

Below is a basic outline to running a small to medium sized HEMA event, the second part of a lecture I gave this year at Longpoint 2017. Enjoy.

Stage 1: Choosing your venue

This is the toughest part. Figure out how big a space you’ll have, and if there are hourly restrictions (ie do you get it for the day, what time do they close, do they charge by the hours, etc?) Figure out what you can afford to put up for the venue.

Things to look for in a venue for a long day of fighting are — easy access to bathrooms, easy access to food/water, places to store gear, high ceilings, ample parking, and hopefully a nice floor to fight on. Fairground barns, event centers, and rec center gyms are all places I’ve looked at. Indoor soccer fields seem the best combo for bad weather and very large events.

 

Stage 2: Scheduling/size of the tournament

First question — are there hourly restrictions at your venue (i.e. must you be out by a certain time?) If not, great. If yes, here’s some tournament math to tell you how many pool matches you can easily pull off.

The basic equation is (total number of matches)*(match length)*2.5=total amount of time to run your matches.

First, decide your match length for pools. Say it’s 90 seconds.

Then total up the total number of matches that will be fought in that pool. In a round robin of 5, there’s 10 total matches.

Multiplying it out, 10 matches*90 seconds*2.5=2250 seconds, which divided by 60 is 37.5 minutes.

Assuming you’ll be using the same refs/staff all day, you want to give them a small break between pools. I usually round up a pool of 5 to an hour to allow this.

So now you know you can run 1 pool of 5 per 1 ring in an hour. Calculate how many hours you can or want to devote to pool fights and how many rings you have. One ring and three hours? Three pools and 15 fighters. Two rings and three hours? Six pools and 30 fighters. Restrict your registration to this size, with possible allowances for extra at your discretion, depending on venue restriction.

This is how I came up with the schedule for RMK last year and this year, as well as the size: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1NnOHiL1AfsBmpe35O_feat6d2tuEnuBo_TzMhSflZ_w/edit#gid=0

I have time and room to run 12 longsword pools in 2 rings over 6 hours, therefore I have room for 60 longsword slots. Apply as needed to other events.

 

Stage 3:  Registering people and setting a pricepoint

This is definitely an art and not a science.

Remember to check out https://www.hemaalliance.com/eventssupport and fulfill any requirements you need for event support if you’re going to be applying for it (like providing a discount to HEMA Alliance members).

Take a look at similarly sized events in your region and around the country. A one day event probably can’t charge $100. The big events cost $200+ out the gate. Mid-sized events run $120-180. Make sure you price your registration so you can pay for the venue. This was the biggest mistake I made at RMK last year, and the club lost about a grand over it, because our venue is really expensive. Keep in mind you’re going to lose 4% to banking charges if you go through Paypal.

Once you’ve decided your price point, you need people to register. It can be a pain in the ass to get people to both fill out a registration form AND pay. You want them to do both at one go or you end up with a bunch of people registered who don’t pay until the last minute, or don’t show, making it difficult to tell who’s actually coming and actually being able to pay your venue rental fee.

I’ve searched through a lot of ticketing platforms. Eventbrite is murderously expensive because it charges 5~% per ticket, which is annoying if you want to break tickets down into different tournaments to register people into each event.

Eventbee (http://www.eventbee.com) allows you to set the fee as low as $1 per ticket, or $0 if it’s a free ticket (like I set for the included tournament for base registration, and is free to register your event for. That’s why I chose it over the others. Pretty bare bones in terms of set up, but that’s fine if you’re not looking for especially fancy registration stuff.

More importantly, you can build your registration form into checkout. This means people don’t register without paying, and they don’t pay without registering.

Another reason to always use a third party payment service like Paypal is because they have the encryption to keep credit card info safe. There was a mixup at a tournament on the east coast one year where they had people enter a credit card number into a google form which was then leaked. This is bad, bad, bad. That’s why we should never see CC info and it’s worth the banking fees to have a third party payment service like Paypal handle it.

 

Stage 4: What questions to ask people

Basic info to ask people is listed below:

Name

Email

DOB (If the tournament is age restricted)

Club

Emergency contact info

Their experience level in each weapon to try to set up diverse pools

Willingness to judge/experience level judging

A photo release (which is included in the HEMAA waiver anyway, but it’s better to call it out)

If they ordered an event T-shirt, what size they are

If possible in the form, and it usually is, make these answers required so they have to answer before clicking to the next screen.

 

Stage 5: Getting Prizes

Reach out to vendors. Tell them the size of your tournament and ask if they’d like to sponsor with a prize. Ask neighboring events if they’ll sponsor a prize of a pass. Offer to sponsor passes back.

Getting custom insert medals can be done for $5~ per medal at http://www.trophykits.comand http://www.expressmedals.com. Medals really dress up an event and are a minimum if you’re not going to be offering prizes but want to run a bigger event, IMO.

Other possible prizes include growlers of beer, something neat and local to your region, etc.

 

Stage 6: Scheduling staff 

A spreadsheet is the best thing ever for this. Print it out and hang it up so people will know where they will be. Remember to build in lunchtime, judge warmup time, and breaks.

This was RMK’s last year, as an example: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1cNHP1B8kxhOW1DAA0ZdlpwaPxms_Ru6wGq7A-PSgmp0/edit#gid=0

 

Stage 7: Thank your judges and/or staff
Either with a registration coupon (what I did), a cool patch (what Longpoint did last year), or maybe just calling them out and having everyone give them applause. Judging and reffing are difficult and tiring work and everyone’s a volunteer, so a gesture of appreciation goes a long way.

 

Stage 8: Train your judges beforehand in club with your ruleset during class sparring time. This will really make a difference in judging quality. We start training ours in January, as well as refs. We do this during regular sparring time.

 

Stage 9: Try to publish and distribute your ruleset early, especially if it’s novel. Especially distribute it to the coaches of the other clubs you know are coming who may be judging at your event, so they don’t jump in blindly.

 

Stage 10: The after party: If you plan an after party, it really only needs 3 things: to be after finals, to have alcohol, and to have a lot of food you can get easily. RMK was tough because of how late we get out of the venue on Saturday. I’ve been to some event dinners that were great, and some that were awful because of slow/bad service. Buffets are a good way to go, often.